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We Build Alaska

From the Editors: Housing delayed is housing denied; approve the Holtan Hills development

If there is one lesson that has emerged from the debate over the proposed Holtan Hills development in Girdwood, it is that the phrase “I’m not a NIMBY, but…” will almost always be followed by a declaration of textbook NIMBYism, and that “I’m not anti-development, but…” will almost certainly precede a claim that the speaker of course supports development… just not this development, in this place, at this time, for these people.

Nearly everyone who has visited Girdwood in recent months has seen the “Halt Holtan Hills” signs along roadways. The Halt Holtan Hills crowd has packed Assembly meetings, written op-eds, organized letter-writing campaigns, and carpet-bombed social media in an attempt to convince the Anchorage Assembly not to approve the project. Bizarrely, several leading members of the group have even begun lobbying various Anchorage community councils to pass resolutions opposing the development. They are clearly committed. They are also, unfortunately, responsible for spreading an enormous amount of misleading and false information about a significant housing development at a time when Anchorage, like many other communities, is in the grips of a housing crisis.

The Holtan Hills development is located in the small resort hamlet of Girdwood, on the edge of Anchorage, but what happens here will set a precedent for development throughout the Municipality.

To recap: as currently proposed, the Holtan Hills development would take 60.4 acres of Girdwood land owned by the Municipality of Anchorage’s Heritage Land Bank (HLB) and partner with a developer to subdivide it into a mixture of “shovel-ready” single-family and multifamily lots, with at least one lot set aside for eight or more units of affordable housing. The development would be denser than what is called for under current zoning, which means that more families could be housed. The sale would almost certainly turn a profit for the HLB, immediately help alleviate Girdwood’s acute housing crisis, and provide the first significant opportunity in decades for the creation of affordable housing in Girdwood.

So what’s not to like about this project? Well, not much—it creates the type of housing the Municipality desperately needs and makes money while doing so. Which is probably why those aligned with the Halt Holtan Hills campaign have increasingly turned to misinformation in order to rally the opposition. A few of their claims are worth addressing one-by-one:

  1. “The plan was developed illegally and in secret.” This is flat-out untrue. The project was put out for a public competitive bid. The developer met or exceeded all requirements to interface with the public, and correctly followed existing development requirements, including those created by Girdwood residents in their own Crow Creek Neighborhood Land Use Plan.
  2. “There’s no way to know how much land will be developed or what will be done with it.” There is no mystery here. The answer is: 60.4 acres; mixed density development including land set aside for affordable housing. The Girdwood Board of Supervisors (GBOS) would have the authority to manage the development of the affordable housing portion, or delegate that authority to another entity. This is all public information.
  3. “We don’t want to sell our land to a foreign developer.” The developer, CY Investments, is based in Anchorage. The owner, Connie Yoshimura, is a longtime Anchorage resident who happens to be of Japanese descent and who has a Japanese surname. Yeah… yikes.
  4. “This is the last land available to develop in Girdwood!” This false claim creates the impression that the Holtan Hills development must suit every community need now, lest opportunities be lost forever. In fact, the Heritage Land Bank owns thousands of acres in Girdwood, of which over 500 were deemed suitable for residential development under current zoning in the December 22, 2022 Girdwood Area Plan Update.
  5. “HLB lands are public lands and must be used for maximum public benefit.” This is a misleading oversimplification. The HLB is a division of the Municipality and one of its primary purposes is disposing of land for private development. HLB is not a housing authority, nonprofit, or charity. It does not receive funding from the Municipality and must turn a profit from sales of land under its control. Many residents of Anchorage–including Girdwood—currently live on land that once belonged to the HLB. Creating new market-rate housing during a housing crisis is exactly the kind of thing HLB was designed to do.
  6. “Only current residents or employees working in Girdwood should be able to purchase new housing in Girdwood.” This would be a discriminatory legal and administrative nightmare, and given the demographic makeup of Girdwood, would come dangerously close to creating a legally-mandated whites-only neighborhood. Would anyone find it acceptable if, say, lots in a new South Anchorage subdivision could only be purchased by current South Anchorage residents? Housing discrimination is reviled (and illegal) for good reason.

Probably the most consistent refrain from Holtan Hills opponents is that much of the new housing would be expensive (starting, perhaps, around $500k), and that only affordable housing should be built in Girdwood. This argument, while sounding well-intentioned, is misguided. First, housing has become expensive throughout the Municipality. The average cost of a home in Anchorage has now risen to $456,000. Of course new market-rate housing will be expensive, particularly in a resort community. New housing is expensive everywhere. The point of creating new housing isn’t to immediately house currently-unhoused people but to increase supply for the market as a whole, which puts downward pressure on housing prices at every level. This is a well-understood, evidence-backed principle of housing policy.

Moreover, there is nothing inappropriate about the type of housing planned in Holtan Hills. Every neighborhood in Anchorage—including Girdwood—has single-family and multifamily lots and housing sold at market rates. It is what the vast majority of Anchorage residents live in.

As to the argument that development in Girdwood should exclusively be affordable housing: affordable (ie, below-market-rate) housing does not create itself. There is no nonprofit entity waiting in the wings to build below-market rate housing in an upscale racially homogenous resort community. The genius of the current Holtan Hills proposal is that it creates buildable land for affordable housing by tethering it to economically-viable market-rate single family and multifamily units, and then turns that land over to Girdwood so that the community can guide the creation of the affordable housing it claims it wants.

So what is really going on here? Why are so many Girdwood residents opposed to Holtan Hills?

Some of those who have spoken against the project in public forums seem to be victims of the Halt Holtan Hills misinformation campaign. But many seem, on some level, to just want Girdwood to stay the way it is. Some testified to the Assembly that Girdwood cannot handle new residents—a tacit admission that they simply don’t want more people housed in the community. While understandable (who wouldn’t want that big wooded plot down the road to remain undeveloped?), it would be a grave mistake to give in to this naked self-interest at any time, let alone during a housing crisis.

Now, we need to be blunt about something: there is an intense undercurrent of hypocrisy in some of the opposition to Holtan Hills. Many opponents of the project, including several of those leading the Halt Holtan Hills campaign, categorically decry single-family housing while owning million-dollar-plus single-family Girdwood homes. They condemn AirBNBs while renting out their Girdwood properties on AirBNB. They denounce rental properties while owning multiple rentals. They claim that the Holtan Hills properties will just be bought as second homes, while acknowledging that their Girdwood properties are, get this… second homes.

Notably, the wealthy and powerful members of the Halt Holtan Hills crowd have not set their sights on rezoning existing residential areas for higher density, or on curtailing their own ability to rent their properties on AirBNB, or on limiting their own right to own vacation homes. In fact, those who have run Girdwood for the last several decades have done virtually nothing to support denser, more affordable housing in the community. To the contrary, they have used their positions of power to impose arbitrary restrictions on developers and shut down attempts to develop more accessible housing.

Take, for example, attempts to develop the twelve-unit Powder Run Multi-Family Housing Project. Due to the loud opposition of the landed residents nearby, the project was cut from twelve units to nine. In 2020, the Girdwood Board of Supervisors (GBOS) filed a unanimous letter of objection to the project, asking that it be further reduced to six units and capped at two stories, and demanded that the project include unneeded additional on-site parking. These actions caused two years of delays, drove up costs, and sent a strong message that denser housing would be met with fierce resistance from existing property owners–and that this resistance would be backed up by Girdwood’s leadership.

Powder Run is not an isolated incident. In 2016, GBOS unanimously passed a resolution mandating that residential housing be removed from the Ski Inn development on Hightower Road. In 2018, GBOS unanimously passed another resolution requiring that a four-unit development on Taos Road remove its third-floor and west-facing decks because existing landowners could see them, and also imposed needless parking and snow removal requirements in excess of those required by code.

Imagine having the audacity to wield your political power to ban someone’s deck, merely because someone who owns land nearby doesn’t want to look at it. But as absurd as that is, there is an underlying claim here that is important to note: I was here first, so I get to limit what you can do on your own property. This blatant NIMBYism and sense of entitlement forms part of the backdrop to the anti-development sentiment animating Girdwood today.

So, back to Holtan Hills. In response to criticism, the developer has bent over backwards to address community concerns. The most recent version of the plan disallows short term rentals in single-family residences, effectively granting a lucrative monopoly on AirBNBs to existing owners of single-family housing in Girdwood. But this still hasn’t been enough to placate critics.

Now, opponents of Holtan Hills are demanding that the project “pause” until the community can create a new Girdwood Area Plan. Let’s be real: the notion that a developer can or should adhere to a nonexistent plan that may or may not be created at some undetermined future time is ridiculous. The Holtan Hills proposal correctly followed the legally-mandated public process—including parts of the process put in place by the community of Girdwood itself—at the time that it was created.

Several opponents of Holtan Hills testified before the Assembly that Girdwood now wants the better part of a decade to commission new research and determine how to proceed with the land currently under consideration for Holtan Hills. This is what is often called a “dilatory tactic” in legal and public policy circles. Or, in layman’s terms, “trying to shut something down by wasting a lot of time.”

Many of those who testified against the project claimed to have extensive expertise in real estate. Surely, then, they are familiar with urban planning research showing that protracted delays to construction and development increase risk and costs for developers, the consequences of which are ultimately borne by homebuyers and renters in the form of significantly increased prices. Halting Holtan Hills in favor of years of needless “research” would set a damaging precedent for those attempting to develop in the Municipality of Anchorage, and would contribute to higher—not lower—prices for everyone in all types of housing.

The housing shortage in Girdwood has been apparent for decades. Housing affordability was identified as a “major concern” in the 1995 Girdwood Area Plan, almost thirty years ago. Since then, the contours of the community remain remarkably unchanged. Girdwood’s current housing crisis is due, in no small part, to decades of self-interested anti-development, anti-affordable-housing, anti-density policy championed by the wealthy landed residents who have largely controlled Girdwood’s government for a generation, and who are now spearheading the opposition to Holtan Hills. This policy has been hugely lucrative for these residents, many of whom have watched the values of their properties appreciate to stratospheric levels while they make small fortunes operating rentals in a deliberately constricted market. It has been disastrous for everyone else.

The Municipality of Anchorage does not need to indulge another decade of NIMBY excuses, needless work sessions, and dilatory foot-dragging. All Anchorage residents, including the residents of Girdwood, deserve and need housing. We are in a housing crisis, and the solution is more housing. Development in Girdwood is long past due, and housing delayed is housing denied.

The Editors of the Alaska Landmine urge the Anchorage Assembly to approve the disposal of HLB land and proceed with the Holtan Hills development.


For more about the Holtan Hills controversy, watch Jeff Landfield’s interview with Girdwood resident Christina Hendrickson and Eric Visser, President of the Anchorage Homebuilder’s Association, here.

Correction: This article initially stated that the Holtan Hills plan called for multiple lots to be earmarked for affordable housing. The current plan calls for a minimum of one lot for affordable housing, which would contain a minimum of eight units.

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Ski bum
1 year ago

Hell yes. Rich Girdwood people hate being called NIMBYs bu tthat it is exactly what they are. The “I got mine now pull the ladder up” crowd has been running the show in Gwood for many years. GBOS killing the decks at Lot 12 is the tip of the iceberg. Go talk to others who have tried to develop in Gwood and you will hear many similar stories.

George
1 year ago
Reply to  Ski bum

I feel like the only person really commenting on this is Christina Hendrickson, better go and hex her like she said we do on that stupid podcast that was put out, too! Gaslighting our community… you should be ashamed of yourselves.

Girdwood Guy
1 year ago

While I agree that GW needs development and the GBOS has been ridiculous in restricting that new development this project as outlined in the development agreement is a total handout to the developer. I won’t go into details but basically the MOA will incurring all the risks and costs associated with the project. The development agreement needs to be scrutinized and the people of anchorage need to decide if we want to subsidize CY investments making a whole lot of money.

Anchorage Non-Nimby
1 year ago
Reply to  Girdwood Guy

The Heritage Land Bank and CY Investments would split the profits 50/50, so if you think CY Investments will make “a whole lot of money” that means the HLB will do. Sounds great.

Girdwood Person
1 year ago

I would like to point out that the person who started the recent petition that was spammed all over FB owns a home in Girdwood (appraised at $410K) and a home in Anchorage next to Lake Hood (apprised at $577K).

Girdwood YIMBY
1 year ago

Girdwood appraisals are hugely off right now due to demand. Houses are going for $100k+ above asking. Anything appraised at $400k in Girdwood right now might actually be worth more like $600. Maybe more. Which of course is why we need more housing but the NIMBYs don’t want to do anything that could touch their precious unearned real estate wealth.

Girdwood Person
1 year ago
Reply to  Girdwood YIMBY

Yeah both are valued low. Easily $1.5 million in equity. That same person owns and plane a nice hanger at the Girdwood airport. In other words another multi-millionaire complaining about sustainability.

George
1 year ago

NO another Girdwood person who saw this HUGE mistake and decided to take action!!

Truth Bomb
1 year ago

And another very vocal opponent to HH has an Earthquake Park area home worth (tax appr values) $680k and a GW home worth $735k they are renting out for $7k/month from what I hear. And they own a vacant lot ($189k) that they could sell to someone wanting to build a home, or they could build a home and rent it out or sell. They have a right to do whatever they want with it you say? Yeah, it’s called free enterprise and it seems to only work when it is convenient. Hypocrites.

Girdwood YIMBY
1 year ago

Jeff and Paxon – you are spot-on with everything in this Op-Ed. However, by the end of the day there will be photos of both of you up at every bar in Girdwood under the “do not serve” list. Hope it was worth it! 😛

Chunter Newton
1 year ago
Reply to  Girdwood YIMBY

Who cares…GW drinks the piss of ungulate anyhow

floridawoman
1 year ago

I still think turning the property into a shelter for the Anchorage bowl’s homeless.
Make Girdwood residents at least admit they don’t care for their fellow species of less wealth.

Dan
1 year ago
Reply to  Paxson Woelber

Paxson – is she wrong? Employees of a homeless shelter can’t afford housing in Girdwood. There is no nearby hospital. Policing is limited. Opportunities for transitional employment and transitional housing may be limited. It’s a nice “gotcha”, but do you think Girdwood should build a shelter?

Floridawoman
1 year ago
Reply to  Paxson Woelber

If “we” build a homeless shelter in Girdwood there is no reason why it can’t also include housing for staff…..its really not that complicated.

George
1 year ago

None of this has been said, and none of it is true EXCEPT that PUBLIC LANDS = PUBLIC BENEFIT!! Implying anyone has made a racist statement is disgusting, and simply untrue.

Anchorage Non-Nimby
1 year ago
Reply to  George

It is a PUBLIC BENEFIT to build new housing in Girdwood. I seriously do not see why this is so hard to understand.

Also, if you don’t think anyone occasionally says or believes racist things in Girdwood you either haven’t been to Girdwood, or you haven’t been listening.

Emma Kramer
1 year ago

All housing is not attainable housing. My home is 1500 ft2 and has no electricity, sewer or running water. I have lived here for 23 years, raised two children and remain happily married. It is by choice to live in an affordable Alaskan mountain cabin, hand built, with no mortgage. Is my housing the same as a $750,000 home? I think not! This housing development could include options for truly attainable, and affordable housing. As it stands it absolutely does not do this. Just seeing the use of “any housing is good housing “shows the desparate attempts to respond to… Read more »

the 99587sucks
1 year ago
Reply to  Emma Kramer

Is it 23 or 24 years? You seem to state both, NIMBY.

Girdwood Person
1 year ago
Reply to  Emma Kramer

HLB owns most of the land surrounding Crow Creek Mine Road. How come residents aren’t requesting the HLB set aside those plats for affordable housing?

Truth Bomb
1 year ago

Girdwood chose the multi-family tract for their cemetery. They don’t really want housing, although I guess that is the longest-term rental you can get.

Truth Bomb
1 year ago
Reply to  George

Municipal entitlement lands were intended to generate income for municipalities. As in sell them for tax base, lease them, etc. HLB lands are not the same as park lands and are not the domain of the public like you seem to think they are, Grace. Public benefit doesn’t mean you get to tell the municipality what to do with them.

You’re wrong Jeff
1 year ago

“Creating new market-rate housing during a housing crisis” will not solve Girdwood’s problem when market rate is upwards of a million dollars. Nothing in girdwood is remotely near the 460k you mention in anchorage and never will be. How can you considered a plea for affordable housing nimbyism? The community of girdwood would much rather anchorage subsidize affordable housing than subsidized a private developers profits. “Some testified to the Assembly that Girdwood cannot handle new residents—a tacit admission that they simply don’t want more people housed in the community.” This sentence shows me you have no connection to the average… Read more »

Anchorage Non-Nimby
1 year ago

Girdwood’s “plea” for affordable housing has been inaudible. Girdwood has done nothing to create, build, support, or plan for affordable housing for decades. When push comes to shove, the NIMBYs don’t really care about the poors, except to use them as an excuse to shut down development. The Holtan Hills plan has land for affordable housing built into it, so if Holtan Hills goes through Girdwood can actually build affordable housing. Great. Now Girdwood can stop their “pleas” and actually do something.I would love to have a lot in Holtan Hills. Why do you assume I would build a McMansion?… Read more »

Mike Edgington
1 year ago

This article does a good job of refuting several strawman arguments – but still bases it’s core premise on the trickle-down theory that more high-end second homes will somehow help the pressing need for community housing in Girdwood. This ignores the experience of every other resort community in the US where just building more market-rate housing is at best inadequate and can compound the problems. I do agree that there has been much misinformation about this project – but this article adds to the misinformation. A couple of examples: para 4 “several large lots [will be] set aside for affordable… Read more »

Girdwood Person
1 year ago
Reply to  Paxson Woelber

When Powder Run was first listed the homes were estimated by the developer to be $600K. Delays meant inflation and market rates went up and the price jumped $200K. If GBOS had not challenged the development those homes would have been much cheaper.

As for the 8-plex – if it’s built like many of the other places in the valley the bottom unit will be around 900 sq-ft and the upper unit around 1200 sq-ft. The means the lot could easily house 20+ people.

Kim Van Sickle
1 year ago
Reply to  Paxson Woelber

Why do you think you know what is best for Girdwood residents? Do you really think you are smarter than the 1,500 plus residents who oppose this development as it is currently written? Are you also smarter than the assembly members that voted to indefinitely postpone it tonight? Your article is spreading misinformation about our goals as a community. Our community cares deeply about each other. If this development was the answer to take care of even a small portion of our workforce housing crisis I guarantee many, many people would support it. I was at the meetings as well.… Read more »

Truth Bomb
1 year ago
Reply to  Kim Van Sickle

HLB lands are not Girdwood’s, Kim. They are supposed to be managed, and disposed of, in the best interest of EVERY resident of the municipality, current and future. Read their mission. So this isn’t all about what is good for the precious, entitled, special, misunderstood, indentured (we made you join the Muni and stole your land, of course), people of Girdwood. We look forward to the shitshow if somehow your little land trust gets its hands on HLB land. The dumpster fire will be a sight to behold.

Artemus Gordon
1 year ago
Reply to  Truth Bomb

The Assembly knows the purpose of HLB land, and they are also skeptical of Holtan Hills, apparently.

Kim
1 year ago
Reply to  Truth Bomb

Why are you so hateful towards this community? You just made my point for me. Girdwood residents are a part of the “every”resident who should benefit from these public lands. There are so many successful CLTs doing great things around the country and in Alaska. I don’t know why your having such a strong reaction to a community trying to sustain itself and keep business’s open. Business that are necessary to keep our economy running. Our tourism and residential tax dollars are of value to the municipality. If we can send a human to the moon we can definitely find… Read more »

Anchorage Lifer
1 year ago
Reply to  Mike Edgington

I hope the GBOS supports limits on short term rentals for existing housing stock!!! According to the testimony from Girdwood residents (who apparently make up a minority of homes in their own existing neighborhoods) it sounds like putting those existing units into the long-term rental market and/or available for purchase is FAR and away the #1 largest AND most affordable potential source of workforce housing units. As a non-Girdwood resident with several friends who currently or formerly resided there I don’t feel as though I have much of a dog in the fight, but the leadership in opposing housing development… Read more »

Truth Bomb
1 year ago

Also, if the 172 vacant lots of less than 1 acre that exist in Girdwood today were built on, maybe we wouldn’t be having this discussion. But they are being hoarded by all of these residents who care so much about their fellow man. Spoiler alert: they don’t really care. They want to keep what they have for themselves!

Na na nah naahhhh, hey hey hey
1 year ago
Reply to  Mike Edgington

GBOS opposed denser development recently, and (members of) the Girdwood community successfully delayed the project by a couple years via appeal… (But it was just once, and those units were real expensive anyways! is the implication if the cost were lower the density wouldn’t have been objectionable?) By what percent do you figure developing those Powder Run units cost went up as a result of the 2 year delay? What has GBOS done recently to make which specific developments denser, easier, faster, or cheaper? Similarly, multiple self-described developers who also happen to be Girdwood residents testified against Holtan Hills, what… Read more »

Truth Bomb
1 year ago
Reply to  Paxson Woelber

The problem is that it is a lie. His signature is on a resolution creating an MOU that established the Turnagain Arm Service Coalition (we are talking about Sam Daniel) that attempted affordable housing but they discovered what everyone told them. You can’t achieve affordable housing in Girdwood! He conveniently forgot that, because how could you shut down HH on the premise that you need affordable housing if you acknowledged that it was an unattainable proposition?!

Girdwood Person
1 year ago
Reply to  Mike Edgington

Unfortunately HLB has a stranglehold on Municipal public land in Girdwood, but we do have a ballot proposition in April which would provides alternatives. Interesting that you bring this up. For those interested in what Edginton is alluding to you can watch the GBOS meeting where this resolution is introduced. This resolution would increase property taxes in order to fund a study that would predictably state that Girdwood needs more housing. Note that the resolution is worded to make it sound like the mil rate would not be increased – however if you listen to the meeting then you’ll discover… Read more »

Adelaide
1 year ago

I heard someone at the Muni say that Mayor Mike basically has munchausen by proxy. Keep the town just sick enough that he can be there to save the day. Sounds accurate. Like what has happened with the comprehensive plan thing. The problem is that the chick running against him is a crazy person.

Dan
1 year ago

I don’t really know much about Girdwood, but I am loving the vision this headline gives me of homeless executives sleeping in the back of their Land Rovers with a makeshift blanket made of Patagonia Vests. If only Holtan Hills was developed, we could stop denying those poor people housing.

Tim
1 year ago

This article is misleading on too many levels to address here. The mischaracterization of the Muni residents living in Girdwood is unfortunate. As a full-time GW resident and homeowner, I’m tired of watching people squeezed out of the community by second home investors and exorbitant real estate speculative prices. The CY investment project would be subsidized by HLB (Muni) bargain deal on the land. Many communities with similar housing crisis have demonstrated how we can fairly and intelligently tweak the market in a way that maintains housing opportunities for diverse residents, which benefits businesses. Many of us welcome, more housing,… Read more »

Na na nah naahhhh, hey hey hey
1 year ago
Reply to  Tim

I want a lot of things too! Give me a castle! There is a big difference between wanting something and making it happen. Some folks in Girdwood want more housing (like the commenter Scotty :D) more have been making a lack of development happen. It would be one thing if HLB went behind Girdwood’s back to partner with a corrupt developer on a closed door deal (instead of working with a good/community minded developer?)… But this all started and set its current trajectory under Berkowitz/Chris Schutte et al, and nobody in Girdwood responded to the (public) RFP (let alone actually… Read more »

Truth Bomb
1 year ago
Reply to  Tim

Lydon, give it a rest. “Many of us welcome housing but not this project.” Well, you won’t have another project on HLB land for a very long time, rest assured.

Scotty Daletas
1 year ago

Alright folks, let me tell you a little story about why I’m for the Holtan Hills development. Back in the day, I was a ski-bummin’ UAA student who spent my days on the slopes and my nights at school, for over 4 years. All my money went to rent, food, and hopefully a PBR at the Sitz. I likely taught many of your children from parents that are opposed to this development, how to ski. And let me tell you, it was the time of my life! But as much as I loved livin’ in Girdwood, I realized early on… Read more »

I'd live in Holtan Hills if I could, assholes
1 year ago
Reply to  Scotty Daletas

fuckin preach brother, and good luck with your plans to live in G’wood

Truth Bomb
1 year ago
Reply to  Scotty Daletas

Sorry everyone screwed you, buddy.

the 99587sucks
1 year ago

“The point of creating new housing isn’t to immediately house currently-unhoused people but to increase supply for the market as a whole, which puts downward pressure on housing prices at every level. This is a well-understood, evidence-backed principle of housing policy.”

This is the REAL gripe. Overinflated market values of Girdwood homes might just drop. They cannot have THAT.

I'd like in Holtan Hills if I could, assholes
1 year ago

It’s rich watching the owners of mulitmillion-$ vacation homes in Girdwood harp on the Holtan Hills homes because $500,000+ is “too expensive.” What they really mean is “we want some cheap housing for the people who make our coffee in the morning, we don’t want housing for anyone middle to upper-middle class, and we sure as shit don’t want to see our property values fall.”

George
1 year ago

Who will provide all the amenities a town needs if there is no housing for low-income folks? You think you’ll just put out your own fires, teach your own kids, cook all the meals at home, plow your own roads, grow your own food, run your own ski lifts, etc? Good luck. Infrastructure before 100 unit developments. Better yet, any developer who wants to build here must incorporate affordable housing into their build. We don’t want to go to crap like all other ski towns.